Weight training – Open Door Youth Center http://opendooryouthcenter.org/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 00:42:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://opendooryouthcenter.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-8.png Weight training – Open Door Youth Center http://opendooryouthcenter.org/ 32 32 South Bend high schools improve strength training for football https://opendooryouthcenter.org/south-bend-high-schools-improve-strength-training-for-football/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 04:06:08 +0000 https://opendooryouthcenter.org/south-bend-high-schools-improve-strength-training-for-football/ SOUTH BEND — South Bend Saint Joseph High School never had a strength coach until Mike Simon was hired part-time last year to work with all of the school’s sports teams. Prior to arriving in South Bend from working on the East Coast, Simon described Saint Joe’s bodybuilding state as “Helter Skelter”. “The school really […]]]>

SOUTH BEND — South Bend Saint Joseph High School never had a strength coach until Mike Simon was hired part-time last year to work with all of the school’s sports teams.

Prior to arriving in South Bend from working on the East Coast, Simon described Saint Joe’s bodybuilding state as “Helter Skelter”.

“The school really needed guidance,” Simon said. “Physical education teachers needed guidance and coaches needed guidance on how they should schedule and use the weight room the right way.”

Simon’s first steps were to throw away old equipment and revamp the Saint Joe weight room. Over the past year, Simon said there’s been more of a “skeletal” idea of ​​how the school wants to organize the weight room and weight training into an actual program.

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How One Man Lost 40 Pounds With Meal Prep And Strength Training https://opendooryouthcenter.org/how-one-man-lost-40-pounds-with-meal-prep-and-strength-training/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 17:23:00 +0000 https://opendooryouthcenter.org/how-one-man-lost-40-pounds-with-meal-prep-and-strength-training/ About to turn 30, Peter Do felt dissatisfied with his body. He set out to get lean and toned, losing 40 pounds in the process. He said men’s health How did he do : I was on a family trip to Vietnam, queuing for a roller coaster. Just as my brother and I were about […]]]>

About to turn 30, Peter Do felt dissatisfied with his body. He set out to get lean and toned, losing 40 pounds in the process. He said men’s health How did he do :

I was on a family trip to Vietnam, queuing for a roller coaster. Just as my brother and I were about to get on the front cart, an attendant told me I couldn’t get on – I was “too big”. I was so angry, upset and embarrassed. It was humiliating. And that made me decide to change.

The decision had been made for a while. I knew I had been carrying extra weight; physically I felt so great. I didn’t feel comfortable in my clothes; sometimes I stretched my T-shirts just to make them looser. Wearing bigger clothes was a trick I played on myself to feel smaller in my head. I was embarrassed and unhappy with my appearance; I didn’t want to take my top off at the beach, even when surrounded by my friends and family.

After the roller coaster incident, I decided to get back into shape that would help me be happier. I have decided to register for a transformation at Manchester Ultimate Performances. My trainer, Kylie, believed when I signed up that I could lose over 13 pounds and go from 179 pounds to 165 pounds, while perfecting my muscles. She believed I could achieve more than my goal and I was excited to start.

First, determine the food

Controlling my diet was a priority. Before I started this transformation, I started each day by eating lots of sugary cereals for breakfast and then continued snacking throughout the day because I didn’t feel “full”. I had fast food for lunch, then most nights I had takeout for dinner. I rarely cooked because it’s just too easy to order food online while I’m driving home.

So I started with a meal prep setup from Ultimate Performance, which I did for a few weeks to understand the basics of healthy eating and my portion sizes. Later, I moved on to making my own meal preps at home. It was a real eye-opener just thinking about how and what I ate. I’ve learned that good, healthy, nutritious food doesn’t have to be complicated to be enjoyable, and it keeps me full longer. Adapting my diet allowed me to stay in a caloric deficit without feeling like I was starving. Even when I ate more than I should have, it was easy to get back on track.

Add weights

Before that, I hadn’t done much strength training. I had tried fitness classes and done a bit of strength training, but other than that I didn’t really know what I was doing at the gym. I was just jogging on the treadmill and running outside.

I went from that to strength training three times a week. With each session, I learned what muscle group I was working on and how that fit into my overall progress. On holidays, I would walk for 30 minutes in the morning to get my heart rate up and usually try to move more during the day. I wanted to target my stomach, and even though I hadn’t done any abs-specific exercises, in the end I could really see my core. I also got good results on my back and thighs.

Let your mind change, too

My biggest challenge was staying focused and determined. There were times when I hadn’t planned, and Kylie reminded me to ask myself “why?” Like in “Why am I doing this? Why did I sign up? And I would just have a conversation to myself to pull myself together. Another coach gave me great advice: “The body can change faster, but it’s your mind that takes time to change.”

After six months of training, I went from 29.4% body fat to 11.7%. My muscle mass stayed about the same, but I lost 42 pounds. My friends and family have been really supportive; my twin brother now says, “We don’t look like twins anymore!” Customers pretended not to recognize me, saying, “Where’s Peter? They’re amazed at how much I’ve changed, and when they ask me my secret, I just say, “Good food and a great personal trainer.”

It was a really positive trip. I came away happier and more energetic. My clothes are better. I am much more confident and comfortable in my own skin. I also had more appointments, which is always a plus!

I remember sitting at work and thinking, “OK. I’m going to have the body I want when I’m 30. I can’t believe all that hard work has paid off. It’s a great achievement in my life, and I did it myself! No surgery. No fad diets. Just follow a plan and make it a daily habit and that’s what my trainer Kylie taught me: make better choices about the foods I ate, choosing foods that would keep me full longer and would be nutritionally better off, and also be driven, disciplined, responsible, positive (even at times when I wasn’t), and most importantly, patient.

From there, I want to get bigger and stronger. I want to improve my strength and focus on my current weak points. I continue to work and learn about the different muscle groups so I can really understand how they all work together.

People ask me how to start, and I say, honestly, if you really want this change, then go ahead and make it! Even if you can’t get a personal trainer, there are plenty of tools that can help you on your fitness journey. Don’t compare yourself to others. Your fitness journey is different. Find a way you love, recognize the journey is yours, and don’t compare yourself to others. Be patient and believe in yourself.

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URI Kinesiology Study to Examine Response to Strength Training in Middle-Aged Women | West https://opendooryouthcenter.org/uri-kinesiology-study-to-examine-response-to-strength-training-in-middle-aged-women-west/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 00:45:00 +0000 https://opendooryouthcenter.org/uri-kinesiology-study-to-examine-response-to-strength-training-in-middle-aged-women-west/

KINGSTON — Middle-aged women in the community who aren’t into bodybuilding but who might be interested in the benefits of resistance training are being sought for a research study from the University of Rhode Island’s Department of Kinesiology .

The study will examine physiological and psychological responses to strength training programs in middle-aged women.

According to Associate Professor Christie Ward-Ritacco, who is leading the study with Associate Professor Disa Hatfield and Professor Deborah Riebe, who is also Associate Dean of the College of Health Sciences.

Participants’ physical activity level, body composition, muscle strength and quality, physical function and food intake will be assessed before, during and after the program. They will receive information about their fitness level and answer questions about their quality of life, mood, level of fatigue, exercise self-efficacy, and enjoyment of exercising at different times of the day. program.

“Strength training is equally beneficial for men and women, but the participation rate for women is much lower than for men, especially in middle age,” Ward-Ritacco said. “Part of this study is trying to understand why women in this age group are less likely to engage in bodybuilding, and could one of the modes we use increase someone’s enjoyment for this activity.”

The researchers, along with two graduate students, will compare weightlifting using traditional machines commonly found in the average gym and compare the results to strength training using the Health Fitness Laboratory’s TONAL system. of the URI. They will also examine how people feel before and after each exercise session and determine how resistance training affects how individuals feel in terms of energy and fatigue.

“Everyone knows exercise is good for them, but very few people do it on a regular, long-term basis,” Ward-Ritacco said. “We are trying to understand what the barriers are that prevent people from engaging in resistance training and continuing in this activity. We want to see what levels of physical enjoyment women have using these different types of resistance training equipment. We theorize that increased enjoyment is associated with increased adherence.

Researchers have begun selecting candidates to begin the study within the next two weeks. Potential participants can apply here. Women are qualified to participate if they are between the ages of 40 and 64, can safely participate in physical activity, have not participated in a resistance training program two or more times per week in the past 12 months and are not currently pregnant or planning to do so. become pregnant during the study period. Participants must be female at birth or be medically transitioning for at least one year.

The study will take place over 10 weeks, with participants attending three in-person strength training sessions per week for eight weeks. Pre-training and post-training testing sessions take place in the week before and after the training sessions. Participants will also wear a physical activity monitor on their hip for 7 days during all waking hours at the start, middle and end of the study, and will use a computer program to record food intake on two days. weekday and a weekend day. Participants can earn up to $150 at the end of the study.

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Diet, strength training are major steps to help you build muscle https://opendooryouthcenter.org/diet-strength-training-are-major-steps-to-help-you-build-muscle/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 09:03:11 +0000 https://opendooryouthcenter.org/diet-strength-training-are-major-steps-to-help-you-build-muscle/ Support local journalism. A digital subscription is incredibly affordable and makes you the most informed person around. Click here and subscribe today. Looking to build muscle? Building muscle is often a goal for many of us. Some of us would like to build muscle to achieve a particular physique, while others just want to get […]]]>

Support local journalism. A digital subscription is incredibly affordable and makes you the most informed person around. Click here and subscribe today.

Looking to build muscle?

Building muscle is often a goal for many of us.

Some of us would like to build muscle to achieve a particular physique, while others just want to get stronger.

Whatever your goal, this column will help you achieve it.

Krista’s previous columns:

Krista Stevens, Health Columnist

Benefits of building muscle

Why would anyone want to build muscle? Well, building muscle has many different benefits. Let’s dive into some of those benefits here!

The first benefit of building muscle is an increase in metabolic rate.

The more muscle you have, the higher your resting metabolic rate will be. Muscle cells in our body use energy while fat cells store energy.

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A research-based bodybuilding guide https://opendooryouthcenter.org/a-research-based-bodybuilding-guide/ Tue, 30 Aug 2022 13:31:39 +0000 https://opendooryouthcenter.org/a-research-based-bodybuilding-guide/ Old-fashioned resistance training, like lifting heavy weights repeatedly until you can’t, is the best way for seniors to slow or even reverse muscle loss associated with weight loss. ‘age. Sarcopenia, the medical term for muscle loss, can increase the risk of falls and frailty. Resistance training (also called strength training) can be a big help. […]]]>

Old-fashioned resistance training, like lifting heavy weights repeatedly until you can’t, is the best way for seniors to slow or even reverse muscle loss associated with weight loss. ‘age.

Sarcopenia, the medical term for muscle loss, can increase the risk of falls and frailty. Resistance training (also called strength training) can be a big help. It involves doing upper and lower body exercises using free weights, machines, resistance bands, or even body weight.

Ultimately, the goal is to challenge your muscles enough to feel a difference, but not overdo it where you risk injury. You also want to train for continuous improvement, not a plateau.

The main challenge is to find the right balance between doing too little or too much.

So how do you get to this sweet spot? The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research has published some evidence-based guidelines to follow.

Type: One or two multi-joint exercises per major muscle group have been identified as the most beneficial. There are six main muscle groups: chest, back, shoulders, arms, legs and calves.

Multi-joint exercises are movements that engage more than one joint, such as elbow and shoulder, knee and ankle, etc. They differ from single-joint movements, such as a bicep curl. Multi-joint movements allow you to move heavier weights, build muscle faster.

Lester: It is recommended that older adults exercise at 70-85% of their maximum weight in one repetition. Because learning your one-rep max can be difficult and dangerous, choose weights that you can do 10 reps with with good form. You want to fight for the last rep or two, and leave no more than a rep or two in reserve.

Reps (repetitions): The guidelines have shown that six to 12 repetitions per exercise are beneficial. Start out doing 10 reps because it’s easy to remember, and as you progress aim for heavier weights at six to eight reps.

Frequency: Doing two or three workouts a week produces the most muscle size and strength. Start with two workouts a week, spread out over a few days, then add more as you progress.

It may take a while to start noticing the changes. If you’re not seeing more muscle or feeling stronger after eight weeks, you’re not training hard enough and need to modify your routine by adding weight or increasing the number of exercises.

Mat Lecompte is a health and wellness reporter for Bel Marra Health, which first published this article.

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Female bodybuilding for beginners https://opendooryouthcenter.org/female-bodybuilding-for-beginners/ Fri, 26 Aug 2022 07:00:30 +0000 https://opendooryouthcenter.org/female-bodybuilding-for-beginners/ Strength training, also known as weightlifting or strength training, can often be underestimated when it comes to women’s exercises. Research from the University of Northern Iowa confirms this hypothesis, showing that there is a huge training gap between men and women, with only 20% of women regularly undertaking some form of training in strength, compared […]]]>

Strength training, also known as weightlifting or strength training, can often be underestimated when it comes to women’s exercises.

Research from the University of Northern Iowa confirms this hypothesis, showing that there is a huge training gap between men and women, with only 20% of women regularly undertaking some form of training in strength, compared to 50% of men.

Body image seems to be one of the main obstacles for women. There is a misconception that strength training will lead to a bloated frame, when in reality women have much lower levels of testosterone than men, so it is much more difficult for women to achieve this shape. On the contrary, women will develop muscle tone and definition without the size.

Another obstacle I encounter as a physical therapist is that slow, steady movements seem counter-intuitive for women when thinking about burning fat. HIIT rose to popularity in the 2010s and was widely considered the go-to workout for a quick fix, so women came to prioritize those short, intense bursts.

What many don’t know, however, is that weight training burns calories while you rest. So, the immediacy on the scale after an intense workout can be somewhat misleading.

In reality, what is lost initially is probably water rather than fat at this point.

What is bodybuilding and strength training used for?

Well, in short, loads! For instance…

Muscular mass

As you lift heavier weights, your muscles adapt and develop tone and definition (otherwise known as hypertrophy training).

Functional movement

Lifting, squatting, and lunging are all joint-strengthening movements to make daily activities easier.

Burn calories and boost metabolism

Strength training leads to higher excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC), which can last several hours and increases lean muscle mass, which helps burn the fuel you consume. This then stimulates the metabolism. For every pound of muscle you gain, you’ll burn an additional 30-50 calories per day.

Heart and overall health

A 2018 study from the American College of Cardiology determined that strength training was more effective at reducing the risk of heart disease than cardio exercise, such as walking or cycling (although it should be noted that a combination of both types of physical activity is recommended for overall health).

Strength training can also help lower bad cholesterol and raise good cholesterol, which will help lower blood pressure and improve how the body processes sugar, which can reduce the risk of heart disease. Diabetes.

Performance

Having a stronger body will also help you in your training and triathlon races by improving power, speed, agility and endurance.

Stronger bones

Strength training is strongly recommended for older and menopausal women because lower estrogen levels lead to a higher risk of osteoporosis (when bones become porous and weak and prone to breakage). Resistance training increases bone density and builds stronger connective tissues, increasing joint stability and preventing injury.

It can also help correct Bad postureas well as building a strong back and heart will help prevent any lower back pain.

Mental Health

According to a study published in JAMA Psychiatry in 2018, participants who performed resistance training showed a significant reduction in symptoms of the Depression. Women who train strength generally report feeling more confident and capable as a result of their workout.

Live a full and long life

Bodybuilding is increasingly linked to longevity. A 2019 review published in Frontiers in Physiology suggests that strength training may be even more effective at reducing the risk of all sorts of common age-related chronic diseases than cardio.

Strength training is increasingly linked to longevity, helping to reduce the risk of age-related chronic diseases

Best Combination of Resistance Moves

Don’t feel like you have to do one move at a time. As long as the weight is manageable, you can launch moves targeting two areas at the same time. Here are some of my favorite combo resistance moves for clients:

  • Squat in the overhead press
  • Alternate leg raise push-ups
  • Clean Deadlift
  • Lunges with side arm extension
  • Vertical row in alternate front rise or double arms
  • The triceps dips into the hand at the toes (i.e. the hand opposite the foot)
  • Buttock bridge with chest press
  • Plank row or flye
  • Heel raises in sumo or wide squat and alternate bicep curls
  • Side plank leg raise

How and where to start bodybuilding

Find a professional

As with any type of exercise, I recommend that you seek advice from a certified instructor or PT to check your form, test your strength level, discuss previous exercise history, and give you a structured plan to slowly increase your intensity.

There are plenty of introductory sessions available for this, so talk to your local gym, physiotherapist or fitness center.

Your rhythm

Try starting with simple bodyweight exercises (squats, lunges, push-ups, triceps dips) before moving on to light weights. Stick with the same weight and movements to start with and gradually increase the weight and intensity from there.

Choose a weight that matches the exercise and zone, i.e. choose heavier weights for larger muscle groups like hamstrings, buttocks and quadsand lighter weights for smaller muscle groups like triceps and shoulders.

Plan your training

Whether it’s reps (the action of a full strength training exercise, short for reps) and sets (a set of reps before you rest), duration or intensity. If you find it’s not difficult enough, increase the number of repetitions or the amount of weight you lift.

If you manage to overload – about 7 reps before your form is diminished and your posture is altered – reduce the weight by a few pounds.

If you’re doing a full body workout, make sure it’s no more than 45 minutes and no more than 15-20 minutes on any one specific area.

Rest

Rest is just as important as the work itself. Factor in 1min between sets. Do good stretches and try not to work this area for at least a day. Give your muscles time to recover between sessions.

During this rest, cells called fibroblasts repair torn muscle tissue, which will then help the tissue heal and grow, leading to bigger, stronger muscles.

Mix

Consider a plan that incorporates both aerobics and strength training – perhaps 2-3 cardio sessions with 1-2 strength training sessions per week and increase as you feel comfortable.

Try different equipment like bands, dumbbells and kettlebells. Varying things up can make it more interesting, exciting, and challenging in new ways.

Find a training partner

It can make working out more fun and less intimidating, even adding a bit of cheeky competition. A buddy can also hold you accountable for your fitness goals.

Consider a protein-rich diet

Studies from the Harvard School of Public Health show that protein It has been proven to help us feel full and support healthy growing muscles. To get the most out of your workout, consume 1g of protein for every kg of body weight.

Stay consistent

Once you’ve planned your training schedule, stick to it as religiously as possible. You will achieve gains through consistent work rather than periodic bursts.

Top image credit: Getty Images

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Strength Training Still Offers Benefits For Over-50s | Lifestyles https://opendooryouthcenter.org/strength-training-still-offers-benefits-for-over-50s-lifestyles/ Thu, 25 Aug 2022 14:45:00 +0000 https://opendooryouthcenter.org/strength-training-still-offers-benefits-for-over-50s-lifestyles/ DEAR DR. ROACH: I’m a 75-year-old woman in excellent health. I walk or exercise everyday with fitness videos which are great and provide lots of body science along the way. The only thing I’m not sure about is that the video instructor doesn’t believe in the use of weights and believes that the use and […]]]>

DEAR DR. ROACH: I’m a 75-year-old woman in excellent health. I walk or exercise everyday with fitness videos which are great and provide lots of body science along the way. The only thing I’m not sure about is that the video instructor doesn’t believe in the use of weights and believes that the use and elevation of our arms, legs, etc. will offer enough heft for those of us over 50. the articles say that the use of weights is essential for all ages, especially for the elderly. I’ve used 2 and 5 pound weights in the past for walking and exercising, but even these are uncomfortable. I’ve always had very strong legs but not much upper body strength. What’s the best advice? –AO

ANSWER: Strength training has benefits that cannot be achieved with aerobic exercise alone. Resistance training, usually with weights, is especially important for older women because when done correctly, it increases muscle strength and balance. It also reduces the risk of falling, as well as bone strength, thus reducing the risk of fracture even in the event of a fall. Exercising with a combination of aerobics, stretching, and weights is ideal, since each provides independent benefits.

However, sometimes we don’t live in an ideal world, and any exercise is better than no exercise. I wouldn’t want you to give up completely because you think you’re not getting benefits without the weights. Exercise using body weight can also increase strength. You don’t need to have physical weights in your hand to reap the benefits of resistance exercise.

I generally advise against holding weights in the hand (or attached to the limbs) while walking or jogging. This can alter your natural gait and put pressure on your lower joints, from toes to hips. It may also have the potential for upper limb injuries. I recommend separating your aerobic activity from your strength training activity.

DEAR DR. ROACH: Three days after receiving a COVID booster, I started a nine-day course of oral prednisone (40mg tapering to 10mg). Since the nurse practitioner who issued the booster also prescribed prednisone (for psoriasis), I didn’t think there was a problem, but I later read that prednisone can interfere with the recall effectiveness. I saw my doctor and he told me that because I started prednisone three days after the booster, it was “probably effective”. Do you agree? I’m worried because my husband is at very high risk for serious complications from COVID. –GC

ANSWER: I agree with your doctor that the booster dose of the vaccine was probably effective. I know you would like to hear me say it was absolutely effective, but there is no solid evidence to prove it.

Most experts say that prednisone at more than 20mg a day for more than two weeks is enough to reduce the effectiveness of the booster, but I think the three days you had of the vaccine before you started prednisone – and the fact that you weren’t on very high doses or for very long – makes the vaccine most likely effective.

I hope your husband has had four doses of the COVID vaccine. If he is unable to get vaccinated, has a medical condition, or is currently taking medication that is much more concerning than the doses of prednisone you were taking, he should consider Evusheld (a combination of anti-COVID antibodies) to give him a additional protection for approximately six months.

Dr Roach regrets that we cannot respond to individual letters, but will incorporate them into the column whenever possible. Readers can email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med.cornell.edu or send mail to 628 Virginia Dr., Orlando, FL 32803.

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Dear Doctor: Strength training has benefits that cannot be achieved with aerobic exercise alone. https://opendooryouthcenter.org/dear-doctor-strength-training-has-benefits-that-cannot-be-achieved-with-aerobic-exercise-alone/ Thu, 25 Aug 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://opendooryouthcenter.org/dear-doctor-strength-training-has-benefits-that-cannot-be-achieved-with-aerobic-exercise-alone/ DEAR DR. ROACH: I’m a 75-year-old woman in excellent health. I walk or exercise everyday with fitness videos which are great and provide lots of body science along the way. The only thing I’m not sure about is that the video instructor doesn’t believe in the use of weights and believes that the use and […]]]>

DEAR DR. ROACH: I’m a 75-year-old woman in excellent health. I walk or exercise everyday with fitness videos which are great and provide lots of body science along the way. The only thing I’m not sure about is that the video instructor doesn’t believe in the use of weights and believes that the use and elevation of our arms, legs, etc. will offer enough heft for those of us over 50. the articles say that the use of weights is essential for all ages, especially for the elderly.

I’ve used 2 and 5 pound weights in the past for walking and exercising, but even these are uncomfortable. I’ve always had very strong legs but not much upper body strength. What’s the best advice? –AO

ANSWER: Strength training has benefits that cannot be achieved with aerobic exercise alone. Resistance training, usually with weights, is especially important for older women because when done correctly, it increases muscle strength and balance. It also reduces the risk of falling, as well as bone strength, thus reducing the risk of fracture even in the event of a fall. Exercising with a combination of aerobics, stretching, and weights is ideal, since each provides independent benefits.

However, sometimes we don’t live in an ideal world, and any exercise is better than no exercise. I wouldn’t want you to give up completely because you think you’re not getting benefits without the weights. Exercise using body weight can also increase strength. You don’t need to have physical weights in your hand to reap the benefits of resistance exercise.

I generally advise against holding weights in the hand (or attached to the limbs) while walking or jogging. This can alter your natural gait and put pressure on your lower joints, from toes to hips. It may also have the potential for upper limb injuries. I recommend separating your aerobic activity from your strength training activity.

DEAR DR. ROACH: Three days after receiving a COVID booster, I started a nine-day course of oral prednisone (40mg tapering to 10mg). Since the nurse practitioner who issued the booster also prescribed prednisone (for psoriasis) I didn’t think there was a problem, but I later read that prednisone can interfere with the recall effectiveness. I saw my doctor and he told me that because I started prednisone three days after the booster, it was “probably effective”. Do you agree? I’m worried because my husband is at very high risk for serious complications from COVID. –GC

ANSWER: I agree with your doctor that the booster dose of the vaccine was probably effective. I know you would like to hear me say it was absolutely effective, but there is no solid evidence to prove it.

Most experts say prednisone at more than 20mg a day for more than two weeks is enough to reduce the effectiveness of the booster, but I think the three days you got the vaccine before you started prednisone — and the fact that you weren’t on very high doses or for very long – makes the vaccine very likely to have been effective.

I hope your husband has had four doses of the COVID vaccine. If he is unable to get vaccinated, has a medical condition, or is currently taking medication that is much more concerning than the doses of prednisone you were taking, he should consider Evusheld (a combination of anti-COVID antibodies) to give him a additional protection for approximately six months.

Dr Roach regrets that he cannot respond to individual letters, but will incorporate them into the column whenever possible. Readers can send questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med.cornell.edu or mail to 628 Virginia Dr., Orlando, FL 32803.

(c) 2022 North America Syndicate Inc.

All rights reserved

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Strength training still offers benefits for the over 50s https://opendooryouthcenter.org/strength-training-still-offers-benefits-for-the-over-50s/ Thu, 25 Aug 2022 04:01:00 +0000 https://opendooryouthcenter.org/strength-training-still-offers-benefits-for-the-over-50s/ Dr. Keith Roach DEAR DR. ROACH: I’m a 75-year-old woman in excellent health. I walk or exercise everyday with fitness videos which are great and provide lots of body science along the way. The only thing I’m not sure about is that the video instructor doesn’t believe in the use of weights and believes that […]]]>

Dr. Keith Roach

DEAR DR. ROACH: I’m a 75-year-old woman in excellent health. I walk or exercise everyday with fitness videos which are great and provide lots of body science along the way. The only thing I’m not sure about is that the video instructor doesn’t believe in the use of weights and believes that the use and elevation of our arms, legs, etc. will offer enough heft for those of us over 50. the articles say that the use of weights is essential for all ages, especially for the elderly. I’ve used 2 and 5 pound weights in the past for walking and exercising, but even these are uncomfortable. I’ve always had very strong legs but not much upper body strength. What’s the best advice? —AO
ANSWER: Strength training has benefits that cannot be achieved with aerobic exercise alone. Resistance training, usually with weights, is especially important for older women because when done correctly, it increases muscle strength and balance. It also reduces the risk of falling, as well as bone strength, thus reducing the risk of fracture even in the event of a fall. Exercising with a combination of aerobics, stretching, and weights is ideal, since each provides independent benefits.
However, sometimes we don’t live in an ideal world, and any exercise is better than no exercise. I wouldn’t want you to give up completely because you think you’re not getting benefits without the weights. Exercise using body weight can also increase strength. You don’t need to have physical weights in your hand to reap the benefits of resistance exercise.
I generally advise against holding weights in the hand (or attached to the limbs) while walking or jogging. This can alter your natural gait and put pressure on your lower joints, from toes to hips. It may also have the potential for upper limb injuries. I recommend separating your aerobic activity from your strength training activity.
DEAR DR. ROACH: Three days after receiving a COVID booster, I started a nine-day course of oral prednisone (40mg tapering to 10mg). Since the nurse practitioner who issued the booster also prescribed prednisone (for psoriasis) I didn’t think there was a problem, but I later read that prednisone can interfere with the recall effectiveness. I saw my doctor and he told me that because I started prednisone three days after the booster, it was “probably effective”. Do you agree? I’m worried because my husband is at very high risk for serious complications from COVID. —GC
ANSWER: I agree with your doctor that the booster dose of the vaccine was probably effective. I know you would like to hear me say it was absolutely effective, but there is no solid evidence to prove it.
Most experts say prednisone at more than 20mg a day for more than two weeks is enough to reduce the effectiveness of the booster, but I think the three days you had of the vaccine before you started prednisone – and the fact that you weren’t very high doses or for very long – makes the vaccine most likely effective.
I hope your husband has had four doses of the COVID vaccine. If he is unable to get vaccinated, has a medical condition, or is currently taking medication that is much more concerning than the doses of prednisone you were taking, he should consider Evusheld (a combination of anti-COVID antibodies) to give him a additional protection for approximately six months.

Dr Roach regrets that he cannot respond to individual letters, but will incorporate them into the column whenever possible. Readers can send questions to [email protected] or mail to 628 Virginia Dr., Orlando, FL 32803.
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Bodybuilding benefits the over 50s https://opendooryouthcenter.org/bodybuilding-benefits-the-over-50s/ Wed, 24 Aug 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://opendooryouthcenter.org/bodybuilding-benefits-the-over-50s/ Q: I am a 75 year old woman in excellent health. I walk or exercise everyday with fitness videos which are great and provide lots of body science along the way. The only thing I’m not sure about is that the video instructor doesn’t believe in the use of weights and believes that the use […]]]>

Q: I am a 75 year old woman in excellent health. I walk or exercise everyday with fitness videos which are great and provide lots of body science along the way. The only thing I’m not sure about is that the video instructor doesn’t believe in the use of weights and believes that the use and elevation of our arms, legs, etc. will offer enough heft for those of us over 50. However, most fitness articles say that using weights is essential for all ages, especially for older people. I’ve used 2 and 5 pound weights in the past for walking and exercising, but even these are uncomfortable. I’ve always had very strong legs but not much upper body strength. What’s the best advice?

A: Strength training has benefits that cannot be achieved with aerobic exercise alone. Resistance training, usually with weights, is especially important for older women because when done correctly, it increases muscle strength and balance. It also reduces the risk of falling and improves bone strength, thereby reducing the risk of fracture even in the event of a fall. Exercising with a combination of aerobics, stretching, and weights is ideal, since each provides independent benefits.

However, sometimes we don’t live in an ideal world, and any exercise is better than no exercise. I wouldn’t want you to give up completely because you think you’re not getting benefits without the weights. Exercise using body weight can also increase strength. You don’t need to have physical weights in your hand to reap the benefits of resistance exercise.

I generally advise against holding weights in the hand (or attached to the limbs) while walking or jogging. This can alter your natural gait and put pressure on your lower joints, from toes to hips. It may also have the potential for upper limb injuries. I recommend separating your aerobic activity from your strength training activity.

Q: Three days after receiving a COVID booster, I started a nine-day course of oral prednisone (40mg tapering down to 10mg). Since the nurse practitioner who issued the booster also prescribed prednisone (for psoriasis) I didn’t think there was a problem, but I later read that prednisone can interfere with the recall effectiveness. I saw my doctor and he told me that because I started prednisone three days after the booster, it was “probably effective”. Do you agree? I’m worried because my husband is at very high risk of serious complications from COVID!

A: I agree with your doctor that the booster dose of the vaccine was probably effective. I know you would like to hear me say it was absolutely effective, but there is no solid evidence to prove it.

Most experts say prednisone at more than 20mg a day for more than two weeks is enough to reduce the effectiveness of the booster, but I think the three days you had of the vaccine before you started prednisone – and the fact that you weren’t very high doses or for very long – makes the vaccine most likely effective.

I hope your husband received four doses of the COVID-19 vaccine. If unable to get vaccinated, has a medical condition

or is currently taking medications that are much more concerning than the doses of prednisone you were taking, he should consider Evusheld (a combination of anti-COVID antibodies) to give him extra protection for about six months.

Q: I am a fairly healthy 75 year old male as far as I can tell. I had an ultrasound due to lower abdominal discomfort. The ultrasound showed no reason for the pain, which actually subsided. But it showed that my gallbladder is full of stones. I am terribly worried because in the past I have not done well under anesthesia. With colonoscopies, the doctors say they give you something to relieve the nausea, but that never helps me. I vomit and stay dizzy all day, even the next day.

Should I be worried about the surgery itself? I’m beside myself, because the day of surgery is fast approaching. What can you tell me about the terrible nausea I feel?

A: As for the surgery itself, the removal of a gallbladder is generally well tolerated. This is usually done using a laparoscope rather than traditional open surgery. Laparoscopy accelerates the patient’s recovery. This is still major surgery, and any surgery always has risks, but most people recover and have good results.

Postoperative nausea and vomiting are a significant concern. About 30% of adults will have this complication after undergoing general anesthesia. There are indeed many ways to prevent this complication, and your best friend in this regard is the anesthesiologist. You should tell the anesthesiologist as much as possible about any previous procedures you have had, as well as your symptoms of dizziness and vomiting. The anesthesiologist can adjust the type of anesthesia and use not one, but potentially several different treatments to prevent this complication.

Q: I am an 86 year old female and quite active. I have a plantar fibroma on the arch of my foot.
Can you explain what it is, the treatment is for this condition and if surgery is needed? How is the recovery going?

A: A fibroid is a benign tumor of connective tissue. They can occur in a host of different tissues, from skin to muscle, from blood vessels to bone. When they occur on the plantar surface of the foot (“plantar” comes from the Latin word meaning “sole” of the foot), they occur in the thick band of connective tissue called the plantar fascia. The pain comes from pressure on the nodule by your shoes or from being barefoot on the floor, but symptoms are often worse when you’re wearing shoes.

Foot experts don’t rush into surgery. If you have no symptoms, no treatment is necessary. If you are in pain, stretching, shoe inserts, or physical therapy are usually tried before treatment with a steroid injection. If symptoms are not relieved by conservative treatments, if the injection is not helpful, or if symptoms return after initial relief, surgical treatment is sometimes done. But potential complications, including arch flattening, mean surgery should only be considered after other therapies have been given a good chance.

Dr Roach regrets that he cannot respond to individual letters, but will incorporate them into the column whenever possible. Readers can email questions to toyourgoodhealth@med.cornell.edu or send mail to 628 Virginia Drive, Orlando, FL 32803.

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