Study explains surprising link between fitness and alcohol consumption – The Hill

The story at a glance

  • People who exercise regularly are more likely to drink higher amounts of alcohol, a study has found.
  • The study was published in the journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise.
  • The researchers found that men and women with higher cardiorespiratory fitness levels were twice as likely to drink a “moderate amount” of alcohol than their less fit peers.

A new study suggests that those who are more aerobically fit are more likely to imbibe alcohol.

The study, titled “Fit and Tipsy?” just published in the journal Medicine and science in sport and exercise, and found that active men and women are at least twice as likely to be moderate or heavy drinkers than their less fit counterparts.

The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism defines binge drinking for men as drinking four or more drinks a day, or 14 a week, and for women as drinking three or more drinks a day, or seven a week.


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Researchers from the Cooper Institute in Dallas and other institutions studied data from about 40,000 men and women who regularly performed aerobic tests on treadmills at the Cooper Clinic and completed questionnaires about their drinking habits. , according Interior hook. All of those who took part in the study were at least 21 years old and reported drinking at least once a week, according to The New York Times.

The researchers found that moderately fit men and women were about twice as likely to be moderate to heavy drinkers, compared to their less fit counterparts. Men in the high fitness categories were still about twice as likely to be moderate to heavy drinkers, while the fittest women were more than twice as likely.

Researchers aren’t sure what the connection is between improved physical fitness and alcohol consumption.

“There are probably social aspects,” said Kerem Shuval, executive director of epidemiology at the Cooper Institute and lead on the study. Shuval added that more research still needs to be done on the connection.


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Posted on January 04, 2022

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